Imagined Conversations (3.10.14)

A: The smell of blood was in the air, and there were lots of people crying…
B: It’s an issue for sure…
A: I was forced to yell. The world cannot just allow this to happen. I had no other weapon to resort to, no other means to resort to, but to speak publicly and get attention that way.
B: You, sir, were not even truthy.

A Zombie Novel Without Zombies: An Interview with Bennett Sims

I wanted my characters to be able to argue about undeath without ever having to actually run from or fend off the undead… Since the characters don’t feel threatened by the undead, their conversations are free to shift away from the apocalyptic logistics of most zombie fiction (‘How do we survive?’ ‘How do we kill them?’ ‘How do we know who’s been bitten?’) to a more passive fascination with zombies’ creatureliness (‘What do they remember?’ ‘Are they conscious?’ ‘What is it like to be them?’).

A Conversation with Wayne Koestenbaum

I can tell you all sorts of reasons why you won’t sink. I mean, I think ways not to sink include deciding what you want to do vocationally in your early 20s, and devoting time each day, secretly or illegally, to doing what you need to do to pursue your vocation. I.e. Write. Every day. Meet people who will inspire you rather than get you down. Not have bad relationships. Not take too many drugs. It’s a balancing act between exploring your inner and outer anarchy, exploring your libidinal volcanic impulses, and also looking forward…

LIVE from the NYPL: Fitzgerald, Ashbery, Donnelly

…I think it speaks so well to our moment, because we are so inundated with different types of culture, and this idea that we should be hierarchically stacking them or appropriately engaging with them at certain moments or not—I think that’s over, that’s passé, and John’s work is much more fluid, and then you realize all the experimental and progressive work in poetry is that way, too…

A Conversation with Translator David Colmer

Some of the translations are more academic, aiming mainly to reproduce the content of the poems without bothering too much about the form. Others strive to turn the poems into equivalent works in English, with varying degrees of success. Part of the attraction of a collection like this lies, hopefully, in the unity of its approach, and that is largely due to the collection being one translator’s version of Claus…